Leamanagh Castle, Co. Clare
       
     
Poulnabrone Dolmen, Co. Clare
       
     
Corcomroe Abbey, Co. Clare
       
     
Corcomroe Abbey, Co. Clare
       
     
Dunguaire Castle, Co. Clare
       
     
Craggaunowen, Co. Clare
       
     
'The Metal Man', Co. Sligo
       
     
Leamanagh Castle, Co. Clare
       
     
Leamanagh Castle, Co. Clare

Leamanagh castle derives from the Irish léim an éich, meaning "the horse's leap" or léim an fheidh ("the deer's leap").  It was built in 1480 by one of the last High Kings of Ireland and a direct descendant of Brian Boru.  The mist in the air on this morning served to simplify the image.  The road that passes by the castle continues from here into the heart of the Burren.

Canon EOS 5D Mark II

1/320 sec, f/11, ISO 400

Copyright © Mark Carthy - All Rights Reserved

Poulnabrone Dolmen, Co. Clare
       
     
Poulnabrone Dolmen, Co. Clare

Poulnabrone (or Poll na mBrón in Irish, meaning 'hole of the quern stones'), is a Neolithic portal tomb in the Burren in Co. Clare, dating from between 4200 BC and 2900 BC.  Excavations have revealed that between 16 to 22 adults and six children were buried here, along with many of their personal possesions.  It is still a mystery as to how the capstone was placed on top of the pillars.

Canon EOS 7D

1/80 sec, f/11, ISO 100

Copyright © Mark Carthy - All Rights Reserved

Corcomroe Abbey, Co. Clare
       
     
Corcomroe Abbey, Co. Clare

Corcomroe abbey is a 13th century Cistercian monastery in the Burren in north Co. Clare.  The roof if the monastery is long gone but the architecture remains as impressive as ever.

Canon EOS 5D Mark II

0.5 sec, f/20, ISO 100

Copyright © Mark Carthy - All Rights Reserved

Corcomroe Abbey, Co. Clare
       
     
Corcomroe Abbey, Co. Clare

The vaulted ceiling of Corcomroe abbey takes on the warm glow of sunrise.  HDR processing was used in this image due to the high contrast in the scene, to preserve detail across the entire range of brightness.  A wide angle lens emphasises and exaggerates the height of the ceiling.

Canon EOS 5D Mark II

0.8 sec, f/20, ISO 100

Copyright © Mark Carthy - All Rights Reserved

Dunguaire Castle, Co. Clare
       
     
Dunguaire Castle, Co. Clare

A swan swims through a scene composed at Dunguaire castle in north Co. Clare. Part of the lore about Dunguaire's Castle is that the Lord of the castle was very generous and he continued this generosity into the afterlife. One example of this is the story about a poor beggar whom King Guaire had often helped in life. The beggar visited the King's grave and said, "King Guaire, even you cannot help me now." Undeterred even by death, the King's skeletal hand dropped several gold coins at the beggar's feet. According to legend, still to this day, if a person stands at the front gate and asks a question, they will have an answer to their question by the end of the day.

Canon EOS 7D

1/10 sec, f/13, ISO 100

Copyright © Mark Carthy - All Rights Reserved

Craggaunowen, Co. Clare
       
     
Craggaunowen, Co. Clare

Craggaunowen in Co. Clare consists of a castle and these crannógs built inside a ringfort.  Crannógs were dwellings that were in use in Ireland and Scotland for about five millennia, up until the 17th century.  They are defensive structures, usually built on an island and surrounded by water.

Fujifilm X100S

1/500 sec, f/8, ISO 400

Copyright © Mark Carthy - All Rights Reserved

'The Metal Man', Co. Sligo
       
     
'The Metal Man', Co. Sligo

The metal man, off the coast of Sligo at Rosses point, is a 3.7 metre high guardian statue placed here by local seafarers in 1821.  His outstretched arm points to the channel of deep water, allowing boats to safely navigate into port.  In the distance is Knocknarea mountain.  The dark and brooding sky worked particularly well in black and white for this image.

Fujifilm X100S

1/850 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

Copyright © Mark Carthy - All Rights Reserved